The Glitch Mob Weighs In on Rave Culture at Hard Summer 2015

The Glitch Mob Weighs In on Rave Culture at Hard Summer 2015


2 Chainz performs at Hard Summer.

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

With dozens of talented artists on the rise and more than 65,000 expected attendees each day, Hard Summer is arguably the largest annual music festival held in Los Angeles County. Fans from as far as Seattle, San Francisco and Las Vegas showed up for artists like The Weeknd, Porter Robinson, Jack Ü, Odesza, Jai Wolf, Fetty Wap and so much more. Thankfully, the sold out event did not disappoint event goers.

The Weeknd performs at Hard Summer.

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

Fetty Wap performs at Hard Summer.

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

The weekend was filled with banging music, feel-good beats, thrilling attractions and mouthwatering food. And although the music itself is the primary reason as to why fans spend as much as $300 for tickets to events such as these, it is undeniable that the atmosphere is something many people look forward to. After all, the best part of the entire ordeal is the concept of family.

Friends walk arms wrapped around each other at Hard Summer.

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

No one knows this better than three-man electronic music group, The Glitch Mob. Comprised of artists edIT (Edward Ma), Boreta (Justin Boreta) and Ooah (Josh Mayer), The Glitch Mob is quickly gaining popularity among ravers across the nation.

For this dynamic group, raving is a lot more than what people often mistake it for. Since its emergence as an underground genre in the late 1980s, electronic music has evolved into something that means a lot more to fans than partying the night away.

The Glitch Mob, comprised of edIT, Boreta and Ooah

Photo courtesy of theglitchmob.com

 

Ma, known by his stage name edIT, explained the raving culture in simpler terms. “I think all of this right here is really just a mass celebration. I think it’s everyone coming together to take a second to unplug from the stress and hardship of their personal lives or even of the world right now, and just forget that for a night. This is their chance to forget and let loose—come together and connect with each other through music.”

Personally, my experience at Hard Summer was made so much better by the people who attended. My favorite part of the “mass celebration” was just resting outside on a ledge for three hours (unfortunately, some of us can’t hang), and having so many different characters stop by to make conversation with me. Ma is correct in that I wouldn’t have connected with these awesome people without having been brought there by electronic music in the first place.

Boreta chimed in with thoughts on a common rave mantra—PLUR: “The core of this entire community—people joke about it now but it really it’s just peace, love, unity and respect. PLUR. It’s still there. In general, racism, sexism, homophobia and such are not accepted at all in rave culture. There is a widespread vibe and obligation for everyone to really welcome each other and help each other out.”

From the moment you step foot on the grounds, you can feel the vibe Boreta speaks of immediately. When my friends and I arrived at the parking lot, we were greeted by two women who willingly sprayed us down with sunscreen for free. When we got into the venue, various people wished us a good day before heading to their favorite artists. We never passed by another group of girls without receiving at least one compliment, and dancing with strangers was never so comfortable and fun—strangers at first, best friends upon the stage. The peace, love, unity and respect was thick in the air as ravers from all over came to enjoy Hard Summer.

Having been in the business for almost a decade now, The Glitch Mob has never lost sight of what was truly important: making music that changed lives.

“To have been doing this for as long as we have and having gained this much popularity, it’s really exciting and we’re definitely grateful,” Mayer, also known as Ooah, said. “We have to remember we’ve been at this slow, uphill grind and that it’s still like that—we’re still working, and though we are proud of where we are, there’s still a long way to go.”

To demonstrate the already massive impact of the group’s music production, Boreta explained that the trio has received letters from as far as soldiers on the battlefield claiming that The Glitch Mob’s music has changed their lives.

Fellow festival-goer and third year business administration major, Joel Longares excitedly said, “The Glitch Mob’s music has made my life so much more amazing. The best part about all of [Hard Summer] is being able to see them with the people I love most.”

The Glitch Mob went on to perform in front of thousands of fans at Hard Summer, and will be going on year ten of their career come next year.

The hot, chaotic and most of all thrilling weekend closed off with tens of thousands of fans from all over the west coast satisfied with their fill of electronic music, indulgent foods and PLUR-filled experiences.

Did you attend Hard Summer Music Festival 2015? What were some of the highlights from your weekend? Let us know using the hashtag #CampusCropChat on FacebookTwitter or Instagram, and remember to follow us on Snapchat @asicpp!

Jack U performs at Hard Summer

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

Porter Robinson performs at Hard Summer.

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

A fan waves the American flag in the crowd at Hard Summer

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

Mr. Carmack performs at Hard Summer

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico

Hard Summer attractions

Photos courtesy of The Campus Crop freelance photographer Kyle Politico